Chess in the Armed Forces

By Bill Wall

In 1924, the first Red Army chess championship took place.

In 1951, Vladimir Zagorovsky (1925-1994) won the Soviet Army championship, held in Moscow.† In 1952, he won the Moscow championship.† He later won the 4th Correspondence World Championship.

In 1952, Yuri Shaposhnikov won the Soviet Army championship.

In 1954, Anatoly Lutikov (1933-1989) and Arkady Novopashin (1932-2014) tied for 1st in the 10th Soviet Army championship.

In 1955, Leonid Stein won the 11th USSR Armed Forces chess championship on tiebreak over Anatoly Lutikov.

In 1956, Leonid Stein won the 12th Soviet Army championship.

In 1958, Jacob Yukhtman won the Soviet Army championship, held in Moscow.

In 1959, Thomas Emery and Col. John D. Mathas co-founded the US Armed Forces Chess Championship.† Emery was a World War I marine.

In May 1960, the first U.S. Armed Forces Chess Championship (USAFCC) was held at the American Legion Hall of Flags in Washington, D.C.  There were 12 invited participants.† Air Force Captain John Hudson (1930-2012) and Army SP4 Arthur Feuerstein (1935- ) tied for 1st place.  Feuerstein was four times New York state champion and was serving in the US Army in France at this time.  Hudson was a bombardier-navigator on B-52 bombers and a former US Amateur champion (1956).† He also won the Louisiana State Championship in 1952 and the California State Open in 1965.† The Air Force and Army tied for the team championship.† The top 6 scores from each service are added to determine the team winner.† The event was sponsored by the Department of Defense, American Legion, American Chess Foundation, and several patrons.†

In 1960, Eduard Gufeld (1936-2002) won the USSR Armed Forces Chess Championship, held in Riga.

In 1961, Hans Kmoch (1894-1973) wrote a 68-page pamphlet on the chess games of the first Thomas Emery Armed Forces Tournament, published by the American Chess Foundation.

In September, 1961, Eduard Gufeld won the Soviet Army championship, held in Sevastopol.

In September 1961, Air Force Captain John Hudson won the 2nd US Armed Forces championship.† The tournament was sponsored by the US Chess Federation, the American Chess Foundation, and the USO.† The Air Force won the team ch.

In 1962, Vitaly Zhilin won the Soviet Army championship, held in Odessa.

In 1962, Anatoly Lein (1931- ) won the USSR Armed Forces championship.

In October 1962, Army Sp4 Roy Mallett won the 3rd US Armed Forces championship.† Army won the team ch.

In 1963, Vladimir Makogonov and Yuri Gusev tied for 1st in the Soviet Army championship.

In October 1963, Air Force Chief Master Sergeant Irwin J. Lyon won the 4th US Armed Forces championship.† This was the first year that the Coast Guard was represented in this annual event.† Air Force won the team ch.

In May, 1964, Evgeny Vasiukov won the Socialist Armed Forces championship, held in Moscow.

In 1964, Vladimir Savon won the Soviet Army championship, held in Riga.

In November 1964, Air Force 1st Lieutenant Donato Rivera de Jesus won the 5th US Armed Forces championship on tiebreaks over Army Pvt Bruce Albertson.  Rivera played for Puerto Rico in the Varna Chess Olympiad in 1962.† Air Force won the team ch.

In 1965, Vladimir Savon won the 19th Soviet Army championship, held in Odessa.

In April, 1965, Vladimir Savon won the Socialist Armed Forces championship, held in Budapest.

In November 1965, Air Force Airman David M. Lees (1943-1996) won the 6th US Armed Forces championship.  The event was held at the American Legionís Hall of Flags in Washington, D. C.† He also won the Texas State Championship in 1965.† Air Force won the team ch.

In 1966, Viktor Zheliandinov won the Soviet Army championship.

In September, 1966, Vlasimil Hort won the Socialist Armed Forces championship, held in Prague.

In 1966, Army SP4 Chester Thomas Wozney won the 7th US Armed Forces championship.† Wozney later won the Ohio championship.† Army won the team ch.

In 1967, Sgt. Ross Sprague won the US Air Force championship.

In July, 1967, Vlastimil Hort won the 4th Socialist Armed Forces championship, held in Havana.

In September, 1967, Viktor Zheliandinov won the 21st Soviet Army championship.

In 1967, Army SP4 Michael (Mike) Senkiewicz won the 8th US Armed Forces championship.  He was also a world class Scrabble player, backgammon player, and poker player.  He played for the British Virgin Islands in the 1988 chess Olympiad, scoring 9 out of 12.  He was once ranked 35th in the nation in chess.† Army won the team ch.

In June, 1968, Anatoly Lein won the 22nd Soviet Army championship, held in Volgograd.

In October 1968, Army SP4 Charles "Charlie" Powell (1944-1991) won the 9th US Armed Forces championship.  He was 7-time Virginia champion and beat Bobby Fischer in a simul.† Army won the team ch.

In November 1969, Army PFC Steven Hohensee won the 10th US Armed Forces championship, held in the American Legionís Hall of Flags.† Army and Air Force tied for the team ch.

In November, 1969, Janis Klovans won the 23rd Soviet Army championship, held in Riga.

In December, 1969, Semion Furmon won the USSR All-Army championship, held in Leningrad.

In July, 1970, Rafael Vaganian won the 24th Soviet Army championship, held in Sevastopol.

In July 1970, Jan Smejkal won the Czechoslovakian Army championship, held in Prague.

In 1970, Air Force Major John Hudson won the 11th US Armed Forces championship.† He tied for 1st in 1960 and won the event in 1961.† Army and Air Force tied for the team ch.

In November, 1970, the Leningrad team won the USSR Armed Forces Team championship, held in Leningrad.

In December, 1970, Airman Bill Wall won the Sheppard AFB Ch.

In 1971, Air Force 1st Lieutenant Brendan Godfrey won the 12th US Armed Forces championship.  Dr. Godfrey was Director of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and now a senior research scientist at the University of Maryland.† Air Force won the team ch.

In December, 1971, A1C Bill Wall won the U Tapao Air Base Championship in Thailand.

In 1972, Capt John Manson won the Beale AFB Ch.

In 1972, Coast Guard Lieutenant Zaccarias Chavez won the 13th US Armed Forces championship.  He appeared on the front cover of the December 1972 issue of Chess Life & Review.† The Sea Services (Navy, Marines and Coast Guard combined) won the team ch.

In 1972, Sgt Bill Wall won the Kadena Air Base championship in Okinawa.

In 1973, Air Force Sergeant Donald C. Sutherland won the 14th US Armed Forces championship.  He won the California State Chess Championship in 1965 and Colorado Championship in 1973.† The Sea Services won the team ch.

In 1973, Lt Col Henry A. Giertych (1929-2002) won the Beale AFB Championship.† He was a dentist and played in the first Armed Forces chess championship in 1960.

In 1973, Sgt Bill Wall won the U Tapao Air Base Ch.

In 1974, Air Force Sergeant Richard R. Bustamante won the 15th US Armed Forces championship.† Air Force won the team ch.

In 1974, SSgt Bill Wall won the Anderson Air Base Ch on Guam.

In 1974, SSgt Bill Wall won the USO Championship in Thailand.

In January, 1975, Aivars Gipslis, Evgeny Sveshnikov, and Gennady Timoshchenko tied for 1st place in the USSR Armed Forces championship, held in Moscow.

In September, 1975, Air Force Sergeant Charles D. Unruh won the 16th US Armed Forces championship, held in Washington, DC.† He later won the Oklahoma state championship. Air Force won the team ch.

In July, 1976, Josif Dorfman won the 30th Soviet Army championship.

In September 1976 Army E4 Russell Garber won the 17th US Armed Forces championship, held at the American Legionís Hall of Flags in Washington, DC. ††Army won the team ch.

In October 1977, Air Force Captain Robert Bond won the 18th US Armed Forces championship.† Air Force won the team ch.

In May 1978, the first unofficial NATO chess tournament was held in Aalborg, Denmark.

In September 1978, Air Force Captain Robert Bond won the 19th US Armed Forces championship.† The event was held at the American Legion Hall of Flags in Washington, D.C.† The event was sponsored by the American Chess Foundation.† Air Force won the team ch.

In 1979, Army SP4 Michael Fletcher won the 20th US Armed Forces championship.† Army won the team ch.† The event was held at the American Legion Hall of Flags in Washington, DC.

In 1979, 2 Lt Bill Wall won the Wright-Patterson AFB Ch.

In 1980, Army SP4 Michael Fletcher won the 21st US Armed Forces championship.† Army won the team ch.

In 1980, 2 Lt Charles Meidinger won the Wright-Patterson AFB Ch.

In November, 1981, Air Force Airman 1st Class Timothy Brown won the 22nd US Armed Forces championship.  He won the Arizona championship in 1976.† The Sea Services won the team ch. †The event was held at the American Legion Hall of Flags in Washington, DC.

In 1981, 1 Lt Charles Meidinger won the Wright-Patterson AFB Ch.

In September, 1982, Air Force Sergeant Timothy Brown won the 23rd US Armed Forces championship.† Air Force won the team ch.† The event was held in Washington, DC.

In 1983, Capt Bill Wall won the Wright-Patterson AFB Ch.

In 1983, Air Force Senior Airman Emory Tate, Jr. (1958-2015) won the 24th US Armed Forces championship.† He would later win the Armed Forces championship 5 times and become an International Master, rated over 2450.† He recently died at a chess tourament in San Jose.† The Air Force won the team ch.

In 1984, Capt Bill Wall won the Maxwell AFB Ch in Montgomery, AL.

In 1984, Air Force Sergeant Emory Tate won the 25th US Armed Forces championship.† He won the first Haskell Small Award for top individual honors.† The Air Force won the team ch.

In 1985, Army SP4 Roberto Rodriquez and Air Force Sergeant Bobby G. Moore tied for 1st in the 26th US Armed Forces championship.† Army won the team ch.

In 1986, Major Bill Wall won the Central Pacific Armed Forces Ch in Concord, CA.

In 1986, Army Private Richard Russell won the 27th US Armed Forces championship.† Air Force won the team ch.

In 1987, Major Bill Wall won the Central Pacific Armed Forces Ch in Mare Island, CA.

In 1987, Air Force Staff Sergeant Emory Tate won the 28th US Armed Forces championship.† Air Force won the team ch.

In 1988, Air Force Staff Sergeant Emory Tate won the 29th US Armed Forces championship. †Air Force won the team ch.

In 1989, Air Force Staff Sergeant Emory Tate won the 30th US Armed Forces championship.† Air Force won the team ch.

In October 1989, the 1st official NATO championship was held in Hammelburg, Germany.† Germany took 1st place, followed by USA and Belgium.† 11 NATO countries participated.† The individual winner was FIDE master (FM) Niels Michaelsen of Germany.† The top American participant was Emory Tate.

In 1990, Major Bill Wall won the Central Pacific Armed Forces Ch in Concord, CA.

In 1990, Mario Murillo (Navy) won the 31st US Armed Forces championship.  The Sea Services won the team championship.† There was no Air Force team that year.

In October 1990, the 2nd NATO championship was held in Oslo, Norway.† Germany and Norway tied for 1st-2nd, followed by Italy.† The USA team tied for 4th-5th.† The individual winner was FM Gunter Deleyn of Belgium.

In 1991, Major Bill Wall won the Central Pacific Armed Forces Ch in Mare Island, CA.

In 1991, Mario Murillo (Navy) won the 32nd US Armed Forces championship.  .  The Sea Services won the team ch.

In August 1991, the 3rd NATO championship was organized in the United Kingdom at Royal Air Force Cranwell.† Germany took 1st place, followed by The Netherlands and Italy.† The USA took 6th place.† The individual winner was Norbert Lucke of Germany.

In 1992, Major Bill Wall won the Kelly AFB Ch in San Antonio, Texas.

In 1992, Elvin Wilson won the Texas Armed Forces championship, directed by Bill Wall.

In 1992, Elvin Wilson won the Air Force chess championship, held at Andrews AFB, MD.

In 1992, Donato Lacno (Navy) won the 33nd US Armed Forces championship.† The Sea Services won the team ch.

In November 1992, the 4th NATO championship (schachmeisterschaft) was held in the Lutzow barracks in Munster, Germany.† Germany took 1st place, followed by The Netherlands.† Norway and the USA tied for 3rd-4th.† The individual winner was Carsten Lingnau of Germany.† Top American was Bobby Moore.

From 1960 to 1992, the Armed Forces chess championship was fully funded by the Department of Defense (DoD)

In 1993, the Armed Forces chess championship was sponsored by the DoD, but not fully funded.

In 1993, Major Bill Wall won the Texas Armed Forces championship, held in San Antonio.

In 1993, Air Force Sergeant Elvin Wilson won the 34th US Armed Forces championship.† Air Force won the team ch.† There was no Sea Services team that year.

In 1993, the 5th NATO championship was supposed to have been played in the United States, but they had to rescind their offer in the middle of the year due to financial reasons.† It was then organized in 1994 at the Royal Military Academy in Breda, The Netherlands in November-December.††† Norway took 1st place, followed by The Netherlands and Denmark.† The USA took 9th place.† Top scorers were Lucas Van der Linden of The Netherlands and IM Jean-Rene Koch of France.

In 1994, Major Bill Wall won the Kelly AFB Ch.

In 1994, Robert Holling (Navy) won the 35th US Armed Forces championship.† The Sea Services won the team ch.

In 1995, Major Bill Wall won the Kelly AFB Ch.

In 1995, the Armed Forces championship went to an open format.† It was supported by the US Chess Center and the American Chess Foundation.

In 1995, John Hansen and Brian Richardson tied for 1st in the 36th US Armed Forces championship.† Army won the team ch.

In November 1995, the 6th NATO championship was held in Gausdal, Norway.† The Netherlands took 1st place, followed by Germany and Norway.† The individual winner was FM Harmen Jonkman of The Netherlands.† Top American was J.L. Silva.

In 1996, Army Captain David Hater won the 37th US Armed Forces championship.† Army won the team ch.

In November 1996, the 7th NATO championship was held in Viborg, Denmark.† The Netherlands and Belgium tied for 1st-2nd, followed by the United Kingdon.† USA took 6th place.† Andy Hammond of the UK and Fabrice Wantiez of Belgium were the top two individual winners.

In 1997, Army Major David Hater and Dwaine Roberts (Marines Corps) tied for 1st in the 38th annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship.† Hater won on tiebreak.† The Air Force won the team ch.

In November 1997, the 8th NATO championship was held in Apt, France.† Germany took 1st place, followed by France and Denmark.† Hans-Walter Geberl of Germany was the top individual winner.

In 1998, Air Force Sergeant Elvin Wilson and Air Force Sergeant Peter Kurucz tied for 1st in the 39th US Armed Forces championship.† Kurucz won on tiebreak.† The Air Force won the team ch.

In November 1998, the 9th NATO championship was held in Portsmouth, England.† Germany took 1st place.† France and The Netherlands tied for 2nd-3rd.† The USA tied for 5th-6th.† FM David Gross of Germany was the top individual winner.

In 1999, Air Force Sergeant Robert Keough won the 40th annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship.† The Air Force won the team ch.

In September 1999, the 10th NATO championship was held in Stetten am kalten Markt, Germany.† Germany took 1st place, followed by The Netherlands and France.† USA tied for 8th-9th place.† Top scorer was Jan Gustafsson of Germany.

In 2000, Air Force Sergeant Robert Keough (2029) won the 41st annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship, held in Washington, D.C.† The Air Force won the team ch.

In October 2000, the 11th NATO championship was held in Leopoldsburg, Belgium.† Germany took 1st place, followed by France and Italy.† USA tied for 7th-8th.† Top scorer was IM Fabian Dottling of Germany.

In 2001, the US Armed Forces Chess Championship (USAFCC) was renamed the U.S. Interservice Chess Championship (ISCC).† The event was fully funded by the DoD.

In 2001, Sgt Rudy Tia (2126) and Joseph Kruml (2146) tied for 1st in the 42nd annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship, now renamed the Interservice championship, held at Fort Meyer, Virginia.† Army won the team ch.

In October 2001, the 12th NATO championship was held in Sanremo, Italy.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Italy and The Netherlands.† USA took 6th place.† Top individual was FM Piero Bontempi of Italy.

In September 2002, Sgt Rudy Tia (2134) won the 43rd annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship, now renamed the Interservice championship.† The event took place in San Diego.† Army won the team ch.

In October 2002, the 13th NATO championship was held in Brest, France.† Germnay took 1st place, followed by the USA.† Norway, France, and the UK tied for 3rd-5th place.† Top individual scorers were Mark Helbig of Germany and Andy Hammond of the UK.† Rudy Tia and Narciso Victoria were the top USA scorers.

In 2003, Air Force Sergeant Leroy Hill (2068) won the 44th annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship, held at Kelly AFB in San Antonio, Texas.† Air Force won the team ch.

In September 2003, the 14th NATO championship was held in Hovelte, Denmark.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Poland and Norway.† The USA tied for 10th-11th.† Top scorers were Harald Borchgrevink of Norway and Christian Seel of Germany.

In 2004, Narcisco Victoria and West Point Cadet David Jacobs tied for 1st in the 45th annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship.† Victoria won on tiebreak.† The Air Force and Navy tied for team championship.

In June 2004, Narcisco Victoria (2197) won the 2004 Interservice championship, held at Kelly AFB in San Antonio, Texas.

In August 2004, the 15th NATO championship was held in The Hague, The Netherlands.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Poland and Norway.† The USA tied for 10th-12th.† Top scorer was Lorenz Drabke of Germany.

In 2005, West Point Cadet David Jacobs won the 46th annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship.† The Army won the team ch.

In 2005, Narcisco Victoria, Samuel Eshaure, Dan Ranario, Froilan Magpantay, Robert Keogh, and Mustapha Kahlouch tied for 1st at the 2005 Interservice championship, held in Arlington, Virginia.

In August 2005, the 16th NATO championship was held in Kolobrzeg, Poland.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Poland and the UK.† The USA tied for 4th-5th.† Top scorer was Andreas Schenk of Germany.† Narciso Victoria was the top USA player.

In 2005, Riley Lane won the All Service Postal Chess Club Armed Forces championship.

In 2006, 2nd Lt Arthur Macaspac won the US Army chess championship.

In June, 2006, Navy Personnelman 1st Class Narcisco Victoria (2202), Air Force SSgt Robert Bucholtz (2035), and Air Force Master Sergeant Dan Ranario (2030) tied for 1st at the 2006 Inter-Service Chess championship, held in Jacksonville, Florida.† Victoria won on tiebreak.† Air Force won the team championship.

In August 2006, the 17th NATO championship was held in Berkshire, England.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Poland and Norway.† The USA tied for 7th-8th.† Top scorers were IM Andreas Schenk and Thomas Fiebig, both from Germany.

In October 2006, West Point Cadet David Jacobs won the 47th annual U.S. Armed Forces Open Championship for the third time, held at the Armed Forces Retirement Home in Washington, DC.† The commander-in-chief trophy for the highest scoring Academy went to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

In 2007, SSgt Rudy Tia, Jr won the Army chess championship for the 7th time.

In 2007, Navy retired Electronics Technician 1st Class Larry Larkins (2107) won the 48st annual U.S. Armed Forces Open Championship, held in Arlington, Virginia.

In 2007, Douglas Taffinger (2055), Samuel Echaure (2032), Nathanial Ola (2027), and Jhonel Baniel (1991) tied for 1st in the Interservice championship, held in San Diego.

In September 2007, the 18th NATO championship was held in Ankara, Turkey.† Germany took 1st place for the 11th time in a row.† Poland and The Netherlands tied for 2nd-3rd.† The USA took 8th place.† Top scorer was Vytautas Vaznonis of Lithuania.

In 2008, 1st Lt Arthur Macaspac won the Army Chess Championship, held at Fort Meyer in Arlington, VA.

In June 2008, Army Specialist Jhonel Baniel (1992) won the 2008 U.S. Interservice Championship, held at Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson, Arizona.† 2nd place went to A1C Elena Dulgar of the Air Force.† For the first time ever, a woman player makes the roster of the US Armed Forces Chess Team for the NATO chess championship.† The Air Force won the team championship.

In October, 2008, Larry Larkins, Doug Taffinder, Robert Keogh, and Edward Pabaland tied for 1st at the 49th annual Armed Forces Open in Bethesda, Maryland.

In August 2008, the 19th NATO championship was held in Brussels, Belgium.† Turkey took 1st place.† Germany and Poland tied for 2nd-3rd.†† The USA took 8th place. †Top scorer was Serkan Yeke of Turkey.

In May 2009, Army PFC Pieta Garrett (2220) won the 50th annual U.S. Armed Forces Championship, held at Fort Benning, Georgia.

In June 2009, the 20th NATO championship was held in Hammelburg, Germany.† 95 chessplayers from 18 countries participated.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Norway and Poland.† The USA tied for 9th-11th.† Top scorers were Andreas Schenk of Germany and Mateusz Sypien of Poland.

In 2010, Lt. Col Douglas Taffinder won the 2010 US Air Force championship.

In 2010, Arthur Macaspac won the 2010 US Army ch for the 3rd time.

In 2010, Master Sgt. Dan Ranario (2083) won the 2010 Interservice chess championship, held at the Naval Station in Great Lakes, Illinois.

In October, 2010, Navy retiree Larry Larkins won the 51st annual U.S. Armed Forces Open Chess Championship (USAFOCC), held at Joint Base Andrews MD.† Franco Jose and John Farrell tied for 2nd-3rd.† The U.S. Air Force Academy won the 7th Commander in Chiefís Trophy, which features the Service Academy Chess Championship for cadets and midshipmen.

In 2010, Albert Hernandez (2077) and Mario Vonoya (2013) tied for 1st in the 2010 Interservice championship, held at the Marine Corps Air Station in Miramar, California.

In October 2010, the 21st NATO championship was held in Koge, Denmark.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Poland.† Turkey and Denmark tied for 3rd-4th place.† The USA tied for 7th-9th place.† Top scorers were Lorenz Drabke of Germany and Fabrice Wantiez of Belgium.

In 2011, the 52nd U.S. Armed Forces Open, held in Arlington, Virginia, was won by Air Force retiree Master Sergeant Dan Ranario.  The top active duty player was Air Force Senior Airman Kiel Russell.  The Air Force Academy won the 8th Commander-in-Chief trophy as the top academy team.

In August 2011, the 22nd NATO championship was held in Kaunas, Lithuania.† Turkey took 1st place, followed by Germany and Denmark.† The USA took 14th place.† Top scorers were Kivanc Haznedaroglu and Yakup Erturan, both of Turkey.

In October 2012, the 53rd U.S. Armed Forces Open Chess Championships was held on board of the USS Wasp in Norfolk, Virginia.† This was the first time the event was held on a ship.† Dan Ranario (2128) won the event.

In October 2012, the 23rd NATO championship was held in Brest, France.† Germany, Poland, and France tied for 1st-3rd.† The USA tied for 8th-9th.† Individual winners were FM Fabrice Wantiez of Belgium and IM Lorenz Drabke of Germany.

In 2013, Master-Corporal Philippe Leveille won the Canadian Armed Forces championship.

In 2013, the 54th U.S. Armed Forces Open Chess Championships was held at the U.S. Army Transportation Museum at Fort Eustis, Virginia.† Dan Ranario, Robert Keough, Gordon Randall, and Jon Middaugh tied for 1st place.

In August 2013, the 24th NATO championship was held in Rynia, Poland.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Denmark and Poland.† The USA tied for 4th-7th.† IM Lorenz Drabke of Germany was top scorer.† Dan Ranario was top USA scorer.† In the past years, DoD fully funded the NATO championships and the inter-service championships.† In 2013, the U.S. government could no longer fund chess activities.† The USA team came at their own expense on their own time to participate.

In September 2014, the 25th NATO championship was held in Quebec, Canada.† Germany took 1st place, followed by Poland and the USA.† Lorenz Drabke of Germany and Darisz Sycz of Poland were the top scorers.† Arthur Macaspac and Dharim Bacus were the top USA scorers.† This was the first time that the NATO chess championship had been held in North America.

In October 2014, the 55th U.S. Armed Forces Open Chess Championships was held at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs.

In July, 2015, the 26th NATO championship was held at the Royal Netherlands Navy Barracks in Amsterdam.† There were 108 players from 18 countries, making this championship with the largest number of players in its history.† Germany took 1st place.†

In October, 2015, the 56th US Armed Forces Chess Open was held at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia.† The winner was Petty Officer First Class (retired) Larry R. Larkins. †He won the tournament clear first three times (2007, 2010 & 2015) and won first on tiebreaks 2008.  The Air Force won the team championship.

In 2016, the US Armed Forces championship will be held at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD.

In August 2016, the 27th NATO championship will be held in Shrivenham, near Oxford, England.

 

home

 

 

.