New York City Chess
by Bill Wall

Around 1802, the first chess club in New York City appeared. The club soon dissolved.

In 1803, the New York Chess Club was formed. It disbanded in 1804 and re-formed in 1821 with its president being J. T. Watson.

In 1811, Henry Vethake defeated John R. Livingston on board ship in the Hudson River off of New York City (+1-0=0).

In 1821, the New York Chess Club was re-formed, with weekly meetings. The club met at Morse's Coffee House on 31 Park St in Manhattan.

In April 1826, Johann Maelzel's (1772-1838) automaton, the Turk, was being displayed in New York City.

In 1835, Mr. Saunders opened a chess divan in Broadway, near Maiden Lane, in New York City. It lasted until 1837.

In 1835, Bassford's Chess Rooms (established by Thomas Bassford) on Ann Street in New York City was formed. It was later named Bassford's Billiard & Chess Rooms. It was located next to Mr. Phineas T. Barnum's museum at 218 Broadway in New York City. A fire burned down Barnum's museum and Bassford's Room in July, 1865.

In 1839, the New York Chess Club was formed by James Thompson (1804-1870) and Col Charles Dillingham Mead (1812-1876). They held their meetings at the Carlton House.

In 1843, the first known chess tournament in the USA was held in Manhattan. It was a local event.

In 1843, Eugene Rousseau (1810-1870) defeated John Schulten (1821-1875) in a match in New York (+13-8=0).

In February, 1844, Charles Stanley (1819-1901) defeated John Schulten in a match in New York City (+11-9=5).

From February through April 1853, an 8-player knockout tournament was held at the New York Chess Club. The winner was James Thompson.

In October 1855, the Brooklyn Chess Club was established at Montague Hall in Brooklyn. Its first president was Thomas Nichols.

In 1856, Napoleon Marache (1818-1875) won the championship of the New York Chess Club.

In 1857, the New York Chess Club was located on 19 East 12th Street in New York City.

From October 6 to November 10, 1857, the First American Chess Congress was held in New York City. The congress was originally slated to be held at the New York Chess Club, but it proved too small. The event was held at the Descombes' Rooms (a corset shop) at 764 Broadway, between 9th and 9th Streets. The tournament was won by Paul Morphy (1837-1884).

In 1858, the Brooklyn Chess Club at 280 Fulton Street in Brooklyn, New York was founded. It was later headquartered in Bassford's Billiard Rooms at the corner of Court and Remsen streets in Brooklyn.

In the spring of 1859, there was the Morphy Chess Rooms (also called the Morphy Chess and Billiard Room) in New York City, on the southeastern corner of Broadway and 4th Street.

In 1859, the Union Chess Club was formed in New York and composed mostly of German chess players. It was located at 274 Grand Street in New York.

In 1859, Paul Morphy returned from Europe to New York City.

In January-February, 1867, George Mackenzie (1837-1891) won a tournament at the New York Chess Club.

In December 1868, a chess match between George Mackenzie and Charles Stanley was played at the Maltby House in New York City. This was a hotel located at 21 Great Jones Street near Broadway.

In 1868, the first Cafe Europa Tournament was held with 48 contestants. It was played at the Europa Chess Rooms, 16 Division Street in New York City. The club lasted until 1872.

In 1869, the New York Chess Club was re-formed.

In August, 1869, George Mackenzie won a chess tournament held at the Europa Chess Rooms in New York.

In 1869, the Brooklyn Chess was founded. The club's original headquarters was located at 315 Washington Avenue.

In 1870, there was a chess club located at the Cafe International at 294 Bowery, New York City.

In 1870, Captain George Mackenzie won the Brooklyn Chess Club tournament.

In 1872, the Cosmopolitan Chess Club was formed at the Cafe Cosmopolitan, then the Cosmopolitan Hotel, in New York City. It was founded at 1½ 2nd Avenue in New York City.

In November 1875, the Philidor Chess Club was formed at 61-73 Meserole Street (corner of Meserole and Lorimer Streets) in Brooklyn.

In August, 1876, George Mackenzie won the Cafe International Tournament, held in New York City.

In September-October, 1876, James Mason (1849-1905) won the Clipper Tournament in New York City.

In 1876, the main New York City chess clubs were the New York Chess Club (Cafe Cosmopolitan, 1 ½ Second Ave), Cafe International (294 Broadway), Turner Hall Chess Club (Mercantile Building, Montague Street), and the Philidor Chess Club (212 Graham Ave, Williamsburg).

In the summer of 1877 chess players met at the German cafe, Cafe Logeling, 49 Bowery Street (between Bayard and Canal Streets) in lower Manhattan. Mr. C. W. Logeling was a chess enthusiast and eventually built a room over the garden in the back of the cafe for chess. This became the Manhattan Chess Club.

On November 24, 1877, it was decided to from a Chess Club at the Cafe Logeling. There was some discussion as to whether it would be called the Metropolitan Chess Club, the Morphy Chess Club, or the Manhattan Chess Club.

On December 1, 1877, the first regular meeting at the Manhattan Chess Club was held. There were 37 members at the time. Dues were $4 per year (equivalent to $90 in today's money in 2016).

In 1878, the Danites Chess Club was formed in Brooklyn. It was later absorbed by the Brooklyn Chess Club.

In May 1879, the Manhattan Chess Club defeated the New York Chess Club, winning a silver champagne cup.

In January, 1880, George Mackenzie won the 5th American Chess Congress, held at the Union Square Billiard Room (where the first professional billiards tournament was held in 1860) in New York City.

In 1882, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to 110 East Fourteenth Street.

In 1883, there was the first City Chess Club tournament.

In January 1883, the Manhattan Chess Club defeated the Danites Chess Club of Brooklyn.

In 1883, Wilhelm (changed to William in 1888) Steinitz (1836-1900) moved to New York City.

In May 1883, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to 104 East 14th Street, opposite Steinway Hall.

In 1884, the New York Chess Club was located at 1 ½ Second Street (near Houston St.).

In 1884, chess was played at the Turn Verein Chess Club located at 66 and 68 East 4th Street, New York City.

In 1884, he Telegraphers' Chess Club was located in the Western Union Building in New York City.

In 1884, the Paul Morphy Chess Association met at 427 Gates Avenue.

In May 1884, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to 22 East 17th Street.

In March 1885, the Manhattan Chess Club shared its premises with the New York Chess Cub until then Manhattan CC moved in May 1885.

In May 1885, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to No. 22 East Seventeenth Street, occupying the lower floor of the building.

In 1885, Ajeeb, the automaton, was at the Eden Musee (between 5th and 6th Avenues) in New York City.

In 1885, Wilhelm Steinitz lived at 986 Fulton Ave, Brooklyn.

In April 1886, Steinitz defeated all 19 players at the Danites Chess Club, Brooklyn.

In 1886, part of the world chess championship match between William Steinitz and Johannes Zukertort (1842-1888) was played in New York City. The beginning of the match was played at the Dancing Academy in Cartier's Hall at No. 80 5th Avenue and Ninth Street in Manhattan. Admission fee was $1 a day. In New York, Zukertort won 4 games and Steinitz won one game, before moving on to St. Louis. Steinitz won the match (10 wins, 5 losses, 5 draws) and $4,000 (over $100,000 in today's currency).

In 1886, Eugene Delmar (1841-1909) won the New York Chess Club Tourney.

In October 1886, the Brooklyn Chess Club was organized, located at 198 Montague Street, Brooklyn.

In 1887, a new chess club met at the Cafe Cosmopolitan at 1 Second Avenue, Manhattan.

In May 1887, the Columbia Chess Club was formed at Columbia College in New York. It met at their rooms at No. 1 Second Avenue.

In May 1887, the New York Chess Club defeated the Manhattan Chess Club in a match. It was the first defeat in match play by the Manhattan CC.

In July 1887, the Manhattan Chess Club defeated the Brooklyn Chess Club in two matches.

In 1888, the Jeffersonian Chess Club was formed at 101 West 10th Street in New York City.

In 1888, there were at least 12 chess clubs in New York City. The Manhattan CC was at 22 East 17th St. The Columbia CC was at 1 2nd Ave. The New York CC was at 49 Bowery. The Jeffersonian CC was at 101 West 10th St. The La Bourdonnais CC was at Columbia College. The Turn Verein Schach Club (Turnverein Chess Club) was at 66 East 4th St. The Telegraphers' CC was at the Western Union Building, room 57, New York. The Brooklyn CC was at 315 Washington St in Brooklyn. The Philidor CC was at the corner of Meserole and Lorianer Streets in Brooklyn.

In 1888, the Brooklyn Chess Club moved to rooms over the old post office on Washington Street. It then moved to 201 Montague Street.

In May 1889, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to 22 West 27th Street in New York City.

In 1889, Mikhail Chigorin (1850-1908) and Max Weiss (1857-1927) tied for 1st place at an international tournament held in New York City.

In 1890, the Harlem Chess Club disbanded. It was located at 177 East 114th St, New York City.

In 1890, the Columbia Chess and Checker Club was active. It folded on March 14, 1891.

In 1890, the Staten Island Chess Club was formed. It is located at the Holy Child Forum in Staten Island.

In March 1891, the New York Harlem and Columbia Chess Clubs merged at the City Chess Club. The new club would soon have 200 members. Dr. Jentz was its president. Sam Loyd (1841-1911) was its vice-president.

In 1891, the City Chess Club was formed in New York City. It was located at the Cafe Boulevard, 156 2nd Avenue, Manhattan.

In 1891, the New York Chess Club closed. It merged to form the City Chess Club.

In March 1892, the Evans Chess Club at 1485 Broadway in Brooklyn was established.

In 1892, the Brooklyn Chess Club moved to 201 Montague Street.

In 1892, the Philidor Chess Club was located at 490 Broadway, Brooklyn.

On May 1, 1892, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to 105 East 22nd Street, occupying 5 rooms on the 7th floor of the United Charities Building. A restaurant and a caterer were installed. The Club remained here for 13 years.

In 1894, there was the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) Chess and Checkers Club at 502 Fulton St in Brooklyn.

In January, 1894, the Women's Chess Club was formed in New York City by Eliza Campbell Foot, a New York socialite. It lasted until 1949. It was located at 29 East 29th Street and also met at Carnegie Hall. It started with 60 women members.

In 1894, there was the second city chess club tournament.

In 1894, the New York Chess Club was established.

In June 1894, the Metropolitan Chess Club was established. It was located at the Central Opera House, East 67th Street.

In 1894, the Caxton Chess Club was organized at the Elephant Club, 1411 Fulton Street in Brooklyn.

In 1894, the Turnverein (Turn Verein) Chess Club was located on Fourth Street, New York City.

In 1895, the Women's Chess Club in New York City was incorporated. It was headquartered at the Martha Washington Hotel until 1920.

In 1896, the Damiano Chess Club was formed at the College of the City of New York.

In 1897, the Bishop's Chess Club was organized in Brooklyn, located at 381 Lewis Avenue.

In 1897, the Sphinx Chess Club, formed by graduates of the Boys High School, was organized in Brooklyn.

In 1897, Frank Marshall (1877-1944) won the New York City junior chess championship.

In 1898, the YMCA Chess and Checker Club was located at 502 Fulton Street, Brooklyn.

In 1898, the YMCA at Prospect Park had a chess club at 357 9th Street in Brooklyn.

In 1898, the Caxton Chess Club was formed at the Elephant House, 1411 Fulton Street, Brooklyn.

In 1898, the Dutch Arms Chess Club was formed at 484 7th Avenue in Brooklyn.

In 1898, the Manhattan Chess Club, located at 105 East 22nd Street of the United Charities Building, moved from the 7th floor to the 9th floor.

In November 1898, the Metropolitan Chess Club merged with the Turn Verein Chess Club. The club was located at 85th Street and Lexington Avenue.

In 1898 the Brooklyn Chess League consisted of the Bishop CC, the Caxton CC, the Dutch Arms CC (located at 760 Carroll Street), Exchange CC, Knight's CC, Pillsbury CC, and the Central YMCA CC.

In 1899, there was a Woodhaven Chess Club in Queens.

In 1899, the chess clubs in Brooklyn consisted of the Bishop CC, Boys High School CC, Brooklyn CC, Castle CC, Caxton CC, Columbus CC, Dutch Arms CC, Evans CC, Exchange CC, Friday Night CC, Knights' CC, Manual Training High School CC, Polytechnic Preparatory School CC, Philidor CC, Pillsbury CC, Progressive CC, Central Branch YMCA CC, and Prospect Park Branch CC.

In February 1900, the Manhattan Chess Club pledged $300 to the second wife (Elizabeth) and two children (a boy of 5 and a girl of 18 months) of William Steinitz, who was confined to the hospital for the insane on Ward's Island in New York. The Steinitz family was left in destitute condition.

In 1900, the Caxton Chess Club merged with the Brooklyn Chess Club.

In 1902, the East New York Chess Club opened in Brooklyn.

In 1902, the University Chess Club opened in Brooklyn.

On May 1, 1903 (some source say 1905), the Manhattan Chess Club moved to the centrally located Carnegie Hall Building, with the entrance on 56th Street. It remained here until 1910.

In 1906, the Women's Chess Club of New York sponsored the first American Women's Chess Congress at the Martha Washington Hotel.

In 1910, the Manhattan Chess Club was located at the Sherman Square Hotel until 1923.

On October 11, 1914, Reuben Fine (1914-1993) was born in the Bronx.

In September 1915, Frank Marshall established the Chess Divan for himself in the back room of Keen's Chop House, 70 West Thirty-sixth street in Manhattan (now Keens Steakhouse on 72 West 36 Street, established in 1885).

In 1916, Marshall's Chess Divan was established in a room over the Pepper Pot at 146 (now numbered 148) West 4th St.

In July 1916, Marshall's Chess Divan moved for the fourth time. It was now located at the Hotel Chelsea, Seventh Avenue and Twenty-third street, New York.

In 1916, the Manhattan Chess Club won the Metropolitan Chess League, which consisted of the Manhattan CC, the Progressive CC, the Brooklyn CC, the Staten Island CC, the Columbia CC, the Ocean Hill CC, and the City College CC. The Manhattan CC celebrated their victory at the Hotel McAlpin.

In August, 1918, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to the Sherman Square Hotel at Broadway and 71st Street.

In October-November 1918, the Manhattan CC sponsored an international chess tournament. It was held at the club's parlor in the Sherman Square Hotel. Five countries were represented including the United States, Cuba, Canada, France, and Serbia. The event was won by Jose Capablanca (1888-1942).

In January 1919, the Marshall's Chess Divan moved to 57 West Fifty-First Street in Manhattan, New York, a private residence.

In 1920, Samuel Reshevsky (1911-1992) came from Europe and played chess in New York City.

In 1920, the Women's Chess Club was located at the Women's University Club and at the Hotel Biltmore.

In 1921, the Cooper Union Chess Club was organized in New York City.

In 1922, Frank Marshall started the Marshall Chess Club to rival the Manhattan Chess Club.

In 1923, the New York Commercial Chess League was started by chess players at ConEdison. New York teams have included Western Electric, AT&T, IBM, Equitable Life, Transit Authority, Naval Shipyard, the Veterans Administration, Bell Telephone, Housing Authority, Metropolitan Life, Merrill Lynch, Civil Service, Doge Corporation, Revlon, Port Authority, Group Health, Pepsi-Cola... In later years, it included the United Nations.

In 1923, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to Beacon Hotel.

In 1924, the New York 1924 international tournament was held. The organizer was Norbert Lederer. The event was won by Emanuel Lasker (1868-1941).

From February 19 to March 25, 1927, the New York 1927 International tournament was held. It was played at the Manhattan Square Hotel. The organizer was Norbert Lederer. The event was won by Jose Capablanca.

During the Depression, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to a basement on Broadway and 73rd Street, where the rent was very low.

In 1931, Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957) earned money by hustling chess in an arcade window in New York City, taking on all challengers. Bogart earned money for his meals by hustling chess at the numerous "sportslands" on Sixth Avenue in Manhattan. For a bet of 50 cents a game, he played all comers. If he won, he got one dollar. He won more than he lost. At an arcade, he would sit in a window playing chess for a dollar a game. He usually played about 40 people a day.

In the 1930s, the Women's Chess Club met in the directors' room of Abercrombie and Fitch sports equipment store in New York City.

In 1932, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to the Hotel Alamac (160 West 71st Street, New York City). It remained here for 9 years.

In 1934, the first outdoor chess court in Washington Square was installed.

In 1934, the Log Cabin Chess Club was formed at the home of E. Forry Laucks (1898-1965), 30 Collamore Terrace, West Orange, NJ. The competed against most of the chess clubs in New York City.

In 1936, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to the 17th floor of the Hotel Beacon at Broadway and 75th Street.

In 1937, Emanuel Lasker took up residence in New York City.

In June 1938, women were allowed to become members of the Manhattan Chess Club.

In 1938, the US Women's chess championship was held in New York City. It was organized by Mr. Louis Wolff, 44 Wall Street, New York City.

In 1939, the US Chess Open was in New York City.

In 1940, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to the Mecca Temple (later, the New York City Center), 135 West 55th Street.

In 1940, the Manhattan CC was located in Maurice Wertheim's (1886-1950) penthouse apartment.

From April 27 to May 19, 1940, the US chess championship was held in New York.

In the 1940s, the Women's Chess Club met at the home of charter member, Mrs. William G. VerPlanck on Riverside Drive in New York City.

In 1941 to 1956 the Manhattan Chess Club was located at 100 Central Park South. Maurice Wertheim helped move the chess club to better quarters. The Club remained there more than 15 years. The dues were $36 a year (equivalent to over $500 in today's money).

On March 7, 1942, Jose Capablanca fell from a stroke while watching a chess game at the Manhattan Chess Club. He died the next day.

In 1942, there was a Bronx Physicians Chess Club.

In 1942, there was a New World Chess and Bridge Club located at 252 West 76th Street in New York City.

In the 1940s, chess tournaments were being held at the Henry Hudson Hotel in New York City, located at 353 West 57th Street (at 9th Avenue).

In 1944, the Metropolitan League of New York City was created. It consisted of the Manhattan CC, the Marshall CC, the Columbia University CC, the Log Cabin CC, the London Terrace CC, the Intercollegiate CC, Jamaica CC, Bronx-Westchester CC, Staten Island CC, Queens CC, Lithuanian CC, and the Academy of Chess CC.

In 1945, the US chess team played the Soviets by radio. The US team played in the ballroom of the Henry Hudson Hotel in New York City.

From October 26 to November 16, 1946, the 6th biennial US chess championship was held in New York City.

In 1947, the Weatt Chess Club of Bell System in New York City was formed.

In 1947, the Women's Chess Club met at the National Women's Republican Club and at the York Club.

In the 1940s, John "Jack" Collins (1912-2001) started the Hawthorne Chess Club. His first house was on Hawthorne Street in Brooklyn, so he named his chess club that met at his house, the Hawthorne Chess Club. He later moved to 91 Lenox Road in Brooklyn. Members included Bobby Fischer, Bill Lombardy, the Byrne brothers, Allen Kaufman, Ray Weinstein, Sal Matera, and Lewis Cohen.

In the 1940s there was the London Terrace Chess Club, 470 West 24th Street in New York City.

In 1950, Regina Fischer, with Joan and Bobby, moved to 1059 Union Street in Brooklyn.

In the 1950s, the Commercial Chess League of New York City (CCLNYC) consisted of Investments Bankers, Metropolitan Life, Macy's, Consolidated Edison, Central Hanover Bank, Harris & Kerr & Foster, Western Electric, AT&T, Kellogg Company, Foster-Wheeler, Western Union, Belgian Bank, IBM, Lummus Company, Bell Labs, Dodge Corporation, United Nations, Combustion Engineers, Bureau of Immigration, du Pont, and Irving Trust.

In 1950, the Greenwich Village Chess Club was organized.

In 1950, there was a New York Academy Chess and Checkers Club.

In 1950, the top New York City High School chess teams were Bronx High School of Science, Brooklyn Technical High School, and Forest Hills High School.

In 1950, almost all of the top US rated chess players came from New York City, including Reuben Fine, Sammy Reshevsky, Alexander Kevitz, Arnold Denker, I.A. Horowitz, A.C. Simonson, Fred Reinfled, Abraham Kupchik, David Polland, George Treysman, Larry Evans, Herbert Seidman, Max Pavey, George Shainswit, Albert Pinkus, Arthur Bisguier, George Kramer, Donald Byrne, Robert Byrne, Tony Santasiere, E.S. Jackson, Edward Lasker, George Eastman, M. Turiansky, Sidney Bernstein, Jeremiah Donovan, Dr. Joseph Platz, Dr. A. Mengarini, and Milton Hanover.

In 1951, Regina Fischer, with Joan and Bobby, moved to Apt Q, 560 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn (Flatbush).

In 1951, the New York Athletic Club had a chess team.

In 1952, the New York Bankers' Athletic League (BAL) formed a chess league. Some of the members include the First National Bank, Irving Trust Company, Chase National Bank, Chemical Bank New York Trust Company, Bankers' Trust, Morgan Guaranty Trust Company, and Bank of New York.

In the 1950s, the Women's Chess Club met in one of the rooms of the Marshall Chess Club.

In 1952, a chess and checker shelter was erected in Central Park opposite of 64th Street.

In 1953, the Pride Knights Chess Club was formed at the Pride of Judea Children's Home in New York City.

In 1953, the Foster Wheeler Corporation Chess Club was formed.

In 1953, a chess club was formed at the Jewish Community House of Brooklyn.

In 1954, there was a Lithuanian Chess Club in New York City.

In 1954, a Soviet chess team visited the ballroom of the Hotel Roosevelt, (Madison Ave & 45th Street) near Grand Central Station, in New York City to play the USA chess team. The Soviets won 20 to 12.

In 1955, there was a Sunset Chess Club in New York City.

In the summer of 1955, the Washington Square Park in New York City sponsored an open-air tournament. It was won by Charles Eastman. The youngest player was 12-year-old Bobby Fischer, who held his own against older and more experienced opponents.

In 1955, the Churchill Chess and Bridge Club was at 252 West 76th Street in New York City. It hosted the first Greater New York Open, won by Bill Lombardy.

In 1956 the Manhattan Chess Club moved to the Hotel Woodrow on 23 West 10th Street.

In January 1956, Bobby Fischer (1943-2008) won the class B prize at the Churchill Chess and Bridge Club in Manhattan.

In the 1950s there was the Chess & Checker Club (also known as the ‘Flea House' due to the fact that there was once a Flea Circus nearby in the basement of Hubert's Dime Museum down the block) of New York at 212 West 42 St. It was first run by Harold Fisher, then John Fursa, then Cal Morris. It was sometimes known as "Fisher's." It occupied the second floor (first floor was a gym) next to the New Amsterdam Theatre and was open 24 hours a day.

In the 1950s, Chess Review magazine was located at 250 West 57th Street in New York City.

In the 1950s, the Isaac L. Rice — Progressive Chess Club was located at 241 East 14th Street in New York City.

In 1955, the Brooklyn Chess Club was located at 80 Lafayette Avenue in Brooklyn.

In 1956, the Times Chess Center formed at 216 West 42 Street in New York City. It was owned by P. Gaudiosi.

In the 1950s, there was the Westchester Bronx Chess Club at 2244 Westchester Avenue, Bronx.

In the 1950s, there was the Jamaica Chess Club at 149-01 Jamaica Ave, Jamaica, New York.

In the 1950s, there was the Kings County Chess Club that met at the Central YMCA, 55 Hanson Place, Brooklyn. It was also called the Brooklyn Central YMCA Chess Club.

In the 1950s, the American Chess Foundation was located at 1372 Broadway, New York City.

In the 1950s, there was the Morningside Heights Chess Club in New York City.

In the 1950s, there was a Long Island Industrial Chess League, which included the Nassau County CC, the South Shore CC, and the Republic CC.

In 1955-1956, Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999) made the film "The Killing" (first called "Bed of Fear") with several scenes at the Chess and Checker Club. It feature Kola Kwariani as a chess-playing wrestler.

In 1956, the William I. Sirovich Day Center in New York City sponsored a chess tournament for men and women over 60. It was won by Jacob Schwartzfield age 75.

In 1956, the Highland Park Chess Club formed in Brooklyn.

In 1957, the Civic Center Chess Club formed at 157 Montague Street in Brooklyn.

In 1957, the Harlem YMCA Chess Club formed at 180 West 135th Street in New York City.

In 1958, the Idle Hour Chess & Bridge Club was formed at 592 Seventh Avenue (at 42nd Street) in New York City.

In the 1958, Nicholas Rossolimo (1910-1975) opened Rossolimo's Chess Studio (frequented by Bobby Fischer) at 191 Sullivan Street (at the corner of Sullivan Street and Bleecker Street) in Greenwich Village.

In 1959-1960, the US chess championship and 6th Rosenwald Trophy Tournament was held in New York City.

In 1959 the Brooklyn Chess Club was located at 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn.

In the 1959, Mary Bain (1904-1972) started the Mary Bain Chess & Bridge Studio on 145 West 42nd street.

In 1960, the Larry Evans Chess Club (also called Larry Evans' Chess Studio) formed at 145 West 42nd Street, New York City.

In 1960, the Crossroads Club of America at 7th Avenue and 42nd Street on Times Square in New York City formed a chess club.

In 1960, the Greater New York chess championship was held at the Hotel Edison in New York City with 120 participants.

In 1961, there was chess activity at The Golden Rule Game Center, Inc. at 226 West 42nd Street in New York City (the Harris Theatre Bldg, 5th floor).

In 1962, the Uptown Chess Club formed at the Hotel Theresa, 125th Street and 7th Avenue, New York City.

In 1962, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to the Henry Hudson Hotel on West 57th St. (at 9th Avenue).

In 1962, the Yonkers Chess Club formed at the Women's Institute, 38 Palisades Ave, Yonkers, New York.

In 1962, the Levittown Chess Club formed at the Levittown Public Library in Levittown, New York.

In 1963, International Master Raymond Weinstein developed severe schizophrenia and was permanently institutionalized on Ward's Island in New York City.

In the 1960s there was the New York Academy Chess and Checkers Club.

In the early 1960s, the Baltic Chess Club was formed in New York City.

In 1963, the Kingsmen Chess Club was formed at the Bedford YMCA in Brooklyn. It was located at 448 Nostrand Avenue, Brooklyn, and then moved to 26 Brevoort Place in Brooklyn.

In 1963, the Westbury Chess Club was formed on Long Island.

In 1963, Lisa Lane opened up The Queen's Pawn Chess Club (or The Queen's Pawn Chess Emporium) at Lisa Lane's Greenwich Village Chess Center, 122 ½ 7th Avenue South (West 10th Street), New York.

In 1964, Walter Browne won the New York State Junior Championship with a perfect 5-0. It was played at the Jamaica Chess Club in Queens, New York.

In 1964, the business now known as the Continental Chess Association (CCA) was formed by Bill Goichberg (1942- ). It was originally called the New York City Chess Association.

In 1964, the C.Y.O. (Catholic Youth Organization) Chess Club formed at 202 Van Buren Street in Brooklyn.

In 1965, there was a chess and checkers club at 109 West 42nd Street in New York City.

In 1965, the Westchester-Bronx Chess Club was renamed to the Bronx Center Chess Club and was located at 3990 Hillman Avenue, Bronx.

In 1965, the Greater New York Open was held at the Henry Hudson Hotel in New York City, with 206 players. Pal Benko and Paul Brandts tied with a 6-0 score.

In 1966, the First Brooklyn Open chess tournament was held at the Brooklyn Central YMCA Chess Club, 55 Hanson Place, Brooklyn.

In April 1966, Bill Goichberg organized the first Greater New York High School and Junior High School Chess Championships, held at the Henry Hudson Hotel, 353 West 57th Street, New York City. It also included an Elementary School tournament. The HS Team Championship was won by the Bronx High School of Science. The individual winner was Sal Matera.

In 1966, there was a Yonkers Professional Chess Club.

In 1966, there was a Baruch Chess Club at Baruch College, City University of New York, at 17 Lexington Avenue, New York City.

In 1966, Brady's Chess Club was formed at 109 West 42nd Street, New York City. The director was George Brady.

In December 1966, the Greater New York Scholastic Championships were held at the Broadway Central Hotel, 673 Broadway (at 3rd Street), New York City.

In 1967, there was the Nassau Chess Club, located at Levittown Hall, Levittown Parkway, Levittown, Long Island.

In 1967, the Bronx Center Chess Club was formed in the Van Cortlandt-Mosholu area, 3390 Hillman Ave, Bronx.

In 1967, The Chess House (formerly House of Games, Inc) formed at 143 West 72nd Street (halfway between Broadway and Columbus) in New York City. It was owned by Charles Hidalgo. It went out of business in 1977.

In 1968, the Brooklyn Chess Club was located at 434 Albee Square in Brooklyn.

In 1968, the New York City Chess Association (NYCCA) became the Continental Chess Association (CCA), organized by Bill Goichberg.

In April 1969, the first National High School Chess Championship was held at the McAlpin Hotel in New York City. Its address was 50 West 34th Street (corner of Broadway and 34th Street, near Penn Station) in Manhattan. The individual winner was John Watson.

In July 1969, the Atlantic Open was held at the McAlpin Hotel in New York City. Bill Goichberg directed. The event was won by Pal Benko.

In 1969, the New World Chess Club was formed at 2121 Broadway in New York City.

In 1969, the Commercial Chess League of New York City consisted of Western Electric, AT&T, Metropolitan Life, New York Transit Authority, Ebasco Industries, Bronx Post Office, Mobil Oil, International Paper, J.C. Penney, Insurance Data Processing, and the Naval Applied Science Lab.

On August 31 — September 2, 1970, the first United States Computer Chess Championship was held at the Hilton Hotel.

In 1971, the Manhattan Chess Club moved from the Henry Hudson Hotel to East 60th St off Fifth Avenue, next to the Copacabana Night Club.

In 1972, the Village Chess Shop was established at 230 Thompson Street in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, New York City. It closed in 2012.

In 1973, the Manhattan Chess Club had over 400 members.

In 1973, the first World Open, directed by Bill Goichberg and his Continental Chess Association, was held at the McAlpin Hotel in New York City. I played in this event and traveled the farthest, coming all the way from Thailand.

In 1974, the US Open was in New York City.

In 1974, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to 155 E. 55th St.

In 1975, the World Open moved from the Hotel McAlpin to the Hotel Roosevelt in Manhattan.

In 1976, there was a Kings & Knights Chess Club at 7524 Fifth Avenue in Brooklyn.

In 1976, there was a Hylan Chess House at 66 Roberts Dr, Staten Island.

In 1976, there was a Temple Isaiah Chess Club, 75-24 Grand Central Parkway in Forest Hills.

In 1976, there was a Chess City Chess Club at 2639 Broadway at 100th Street in New York City.

In November 1976, the 7th Annual National Chess Congress was held at the Hotel Roosevelt with 447 entrants. Ken Regan was the winner of the event. Bill Goichberg and Joe Lux directed the event.

In the late 1970s, the Chess & Checker Club of New York went out of business. It is now the Disney Store.

In 1977, the New York Threats of new York City won the National Chess League. New York Threats players included Benko, Lein, Zuckerman, Shamkovich, Soltis, Mednis, Rohde, Matera, Regan, Goichberg, Tamargo, Middleton, Joel Benjamin, and Kastner.

In 1977, the largest round-robin international tournament since 1889 was played at the Group Health Incorporated Building, 326 West 42nd Street in New York City. The event was won by Anatoly Lein. Jerry Bibauld directed.

In 1977, Bill Lombardy moved to a 6th floor apartment in Stuyvesant Town (12 Stuyvesant Oval 6B). In 1978, he was mugged near his home. In 2014, he was served with eviction orders for being behind in rent. He was evicted in 2016 and now staying with friends.

In 1978, the Philippine-American Chess Club was formed at 297 7th Avenue in New York City.

In 1981, chess was added to the curriculum at Hunter College Elementary School in New York.

On October 22-25, 1983, the 4th World Computer Chess Championship was held in New York.

In 1984, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to Carnegie Recital Hall at West 57th Street and 7th, 10th floor.

In 1986, the American Chess Foundation (later called the Chess-in-the-Schools) offered free chess instruction to underprivileged New York City students.

In 1990, the American Chess Foundation funded the New York City Schools Chess Program.

In 1990, the first half of the world chess championship was held at the Hotel Macklowe in New York City.

In 1990, Bob Rice created the Wall Street Chess Club in New York City.

In 1992, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to 353 West 46th Street between 8th and 9th Avenue on "Restaurant Row."

In 1992, the Manhattan Chess Club and the American Chess Foundation purchased a building at 353 W. 46th St.

On March 26, 1993, Reuben Fine died in New York City. He was born in the Bronx.

In 1995, the world chess championship between Vishy Anand and Garry Kasparov was played at the World Trade Center. It was played on the observation deck one floor below the top level.

In 1996, the Edward R. Murrow High School Chess Team won the New York City high school chess championship.

In 1996, The Long Island Chess Nuts was established. It meets at the Old Country Road, Garden City, NY.

In 2000, the Manhattan Chess Club moved to the New Yorker Hotel, Suite 1521, 481 8th Avenue. It was open on weekdays from 6 pm to midnight and on weekends from 11am to 11pm.

In 2001, the Max Pavey Chess Club was formed. It meets at the Recreation Center, 48 Macy Road, Briarcliff Mano, NY.

In 2001, the Commercial Chess League of New York (CCLNY) consisted of Blue Cross Blue Shield, Pfizer, Con Edison, Met Life, and many other major corporate companies.

On February 1, 2002, the Manhattan Chess Club closed. It existed for 124 years. Its last president was Jeff Kossak.

In 2007, The Long Island Chess Club was founded. It meets at the United Methodist Church, 470 East Meadow Avenue, East Meadow, NY.

In 2010, seven players were arrested for playing chess in a playground in Inwood Hill Park, New York (Manhattan). The chess tables in the park were off limits to adults if not accompanied by a child.

In 2012, the Village Chess Shop in Greenwich Village closed down.

In October 2013, The Uncommons opened up at 230 Thompson Street at the old Village Chess Shop in Greenwich Village. It bills itself as New York's first board game cafe.

The 2016 World Chess Championship between Magnus Carlsen and Segey Karjakin was played in New York in November, 2016. Carlsen won in tiebreaks. The event was held at the Fulton Market atrium in Manhattan's South Street Seaport.

One of the more active chess schools is Community Elementary School 70 in the Bronx.

There were two chess shops on Thompson Street in Greenwich Village. One is the Chess Forum at 219 Thompson St, which sells rare chess sets. The other was the Village Chess Shop at 230 Thompson Street.

In Bryant Park, the New York Chess and Backgammon Club rent out chess sets by the hour.

The Marshall Chess Club is located at 23 West 10th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenues.

There are chess classes conducted at the Rockefeller Park House.

Chess is played at the Washington Square Park, southeast corner, near MacDougal St and West 4th St.

The Intermediate School (IS) 318 chess team regularly wins national competitions. It is an inner-city public school in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York.

The Dalton School on the Upper East Side has had a strong chess team.

There is a St. Nicholas Chess and Backgammon Club on Edgecombe Ave in New York City.

The Chess and Checker House was located at West 65th St.

The Central Park Chess and Checker House was located near the Dairy Building, 64th St. in New York City.

Fred Wilson has a chess book shop at 80 East 11th Street, Suite 334 in New York City. It has a large collection of out of print books. He took over the office space of Albrecht Buschke. He has in inventory of over 3,000 chess books.

The Strand Bookstore at 828 Broadway at 12th Street in Manhattan has a chess table and sells chess books.

The Brooklyn Chess Club is located at the Seaview Jewish Center, 1585 E. 98th Street, Brooklyn.

The Brooklyn College Chess Club is located at 2900 Bedford Ave in Brooklyn.

The Queens Chess Club is located at the All Saints' Lutheran Church at 164-2 Goethals Avenue in Jamaica, Queens.

The Bob Peretz Chess Club (formerly known as the Bronx-Yonkers Chess Club) is located at the White Plains YMCA, 250 Mamaroneck Ave, White Plains, NY.

There used to be a Polgar Chess Club at 103-10 Queens Boulevard, Forest Hills, Queens.

The Huntington Chess Club meets at the Huntington Library, 338 Main Street, Huntington, Long Island, NY.

There is chess played at Wendy's at the corner of Flatbush Avenue and Empire Boulevard in Brooklyn.





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